A Neuroscientist’s Poignant Study of How We Forget Most Things in Life | The New Yorker

In researching a post about brain stress levels and how we manage information for Howdy Product, I found an interesting article on how many memories we forget. If the author is true, and our “fragments of experience that do get encoded into long-term memory are then subject to ‘creative editing'”, then what is our response? I’ve been thinking about my own relationship to my personal record- what do I want to capture? How do I want to revisit it?

Essentially, how important are my memories to my overall existence?

More on writing your personal record:

Maria Popova – Cartographer of Meaning in a Digital Age (video below). Kottke – developing a personal scheme to categorize your life.

An interesting take on Lisa Genova’s Book “Remember..”:

“To remember an event is to reimagine it; in the reimagining, we inadvertently introduce new information, often colored by our current emotional state. A dream, a suggestion, and even the mere passage of time can warp a memory. It is sobering to realize that three out of four prisoners who are later exonerated through DNA evidence were initially convicted on the basis of eyewitness testimony. “You can be 100 percent confident in your vivid memory,” Genova writes, “and still be 100 percent wrong.” — David Kortava (Source: A Neuroscientist’s Poignant Study of How We Forget Most Things in Life | The New Yorker)

Find Buy Lisa Genova’s book “Remember: The Science of Memory and the Art of Forgetting”:
In a library: Print, Audiobook, Digital
From Amazon: Print, Digital
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Maria Popova, Cartographer of Meaning in a Digital Age

I’m a big fan of Maria Popova- especially her thoughts on finding your own meaning and creating your own personal record (YouTube video):